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Full text of "Novena to the Jesuit Martyrs of Canada Blessed John de Brebeuf and his companions"

NOVENA 

to 

The Jesuit Martyrs 

OF CANADA 

BLESSED JOHN DE BREBEUF 
AND HIS COMPANIONS 

By 
E. J. DEVINE, S. J. 




in 



Published by 

THE CANADIAN MESSENGER 

160 Wellesley Crescent Toronto, Ont. 



THE JESUIT MARTYRS OF CANADA 

The complete story of their lives 

By E. J. Devine, S.J. 

Cloth. 254 pages. $1.50 

OLD FORT STE. MARIE 

The place where the Martyrs lived 

By E. J. Devine, S.J. 
50 pages. Illustrated. 25 cents. 

MEDALS OF THE MARTYRS 

Large size: Round, 1 inch in diamater. Oxidized 
silver, 15 cents each; $1.50 a dozen; $10.00 a 
hundred. Aluminum: 3 for 10 cents; 30 cents 
a dozen; $2.00 a hundred. 

Small size: Round, K inch in diameter. Oxid- 
ized silver: 10 cents each; $1.00 a dozen; $7.00 
a hundred. Aluminum: 2 for 5 cents; 25 cents 
a dozen; $1.50 a hundred. 

RELIC CARDS 

Satin which touched the Relics of the Martyrs: 
5 cents each; 25 cents a dozen; $1.50 a hundred. 

LE FORT STE-MARIE 
(French). A Translation of "Old Fort Ste. 
Marie." 59 pages, illustrated. Price, 15 cents. 



Apply to The Canadian Messenger 
160 Wellesley Crescent, Toronto, Ont. 



lmprimi j otest: 

J. Milway Filion, SJ. 

Praep. V.-Prov. Canad. Super. 



Imprimatur: 



t N. McNeil 

Archiepiscopus Torontinus 







H-r/ 








WHAT IS A NOVENA? 



ANOVENA is a nine days' prayer, public 
or private, undertaken for the purpose 
of obtaining special graces from God directly 
or through the intercession of His Blessed 
Mother or the Saints. It is a form of de- 
votion not merely permitted but recom- 
mended by ecclesiastical authority, and has 
long been in use among the faithful who 
seek favors from heaven. 

Such being the case, to whom should we 
Canadian Catholics appeal more readily than 
to the Blessed Martyrs who crimsoned our 
soil with their blood and who have been 
raised by the Infallible Church to the honors 
of the altar? Let us, then, confide our 
needs, spiritual and temporal, to the care of 
Blessed John de Brebeuf and his Companions, 
beseeching them to obtain for us what we 
desire, provided that what we ask may be 
conducive to the glory of God and the welfare 
of our own souls. 

While God transcends both time and 
space and may hear our prayers addressed 
to him from anywhere on earth, still, as 



2 NOVENA 

pilgrim shrines throughout the world attest, 
He seems to lend a more willing ear when 
invoked in places hallowed by the footsteps 
of His saints and martyrs. 

For this reason the Shrine at Old Fort 
Ste. Marie, near Midland on Georgian Bay, 
rendered venerable as the home of six mar- 
tyrs, where they lived and prayed, where 
the ashes of two of them still rest, is evidently 
a sanctuary where pious pilgrims may hope 
to receive answers to their prayers. 

Thousands have already begun to make 
their way to Martyrs' Shrine, a sanctuary 
which is undoubtedly destined to flourish as 
one of the great pilgrim shrines of America. 
The saintly men who lived there in the 
seventeenth century are now the Beatified 
friends of God, and we may rest assured 
that in the very spot which was once their 
home their intercession will not be sought in 
vain. 



B^ #jg 



FIRST DAY 

Dedicated to 
Blessed John de Brebeuf, S.J. 

Martyred Mar. 16, 1649 4> 



BLESSED John de Brebeuf, known as 
the Apostle of the Hurons, spent thir- 
teen years laboring among those pagan 
Indians. His apostolic career, rendered still 
more thrilling by the sufferings he had to 
undergo, has made his name venerable in our 
annals. Even before he quitted his native 
Normandy he had begun to reveal the 
sentiments which were uppermost in his soul. 
"I felt a strong desire to suffer something for 
Jesus Christ," he wrote, "and I said, 'Lord, 
make me a man according to Thine own 
Heart! Make Thy holy will known to me! 
Let nothing separate me from Thy love, 
neither nakedness, nor the sword, nor death 
itself!' " 

God listened to these holy desires and 
gave His heroic servant ample opportunities 
to suffer during the thirteen years he spent 
among the Hurons. In the beginning of his 
ministry he was looked upon as a dangerous 
sorcerer and was held responsible for all the 
misfortunes which were visiting the tribe. 
The plagues which destroyed the Huron vil- 
lages in 1637 were attributed to his evil 
influence, and more than once he was threat- 
ened with death; but he assured the Indians 



4 NOVENA 

that death had no terrors for him, seeing that 
it would bring him eternal life. The con- 
fidence of the Blessed Martyr in God's 
goodness was boundless. His devotion to 
the Holy Eucharist, to Our Lady and St. 
Joseph, also sustained him during the long 
years he spent in the Canadian wilderness. 
The heroism of this great servant of God 
displayed itself in all its grandeur when he 
fell into the hands of the Iroquois on the 
morning of March 16, 1649. Those monsters 
of cruelty tore off his scalp, poured boiling 
water over his head in derision of holy 
baptism, applied flaming torches to his naked 
flesh, encircled his shoulders with red-hot 
hatchets, and plucked out his eyes. When 
these tortures did not prevent him from 
praying to God and sounding His praises, 
they drove a burning torch down his throat. 
They completed their cruel work by cleaving 
open his breast, tearing out his heart 
and devouring it, hoping thereby to share in 
their victim's bravery. Blessed John de 
Brebeuf expired at Fort St. Ignace, near 
Waubaushene, Ont., on March 16, 1649. 

REFLECTION 

The example of this heroic martyr of 
God teaches me how to bear up under the 
trials of life. He was abused and calum- 
niated by those whom he had come to save. 
He was threatened by them with torture 



FIRST DAY b 

and death. And yet these crosses were 
borne in a spirit of resignation, and only 
excited him to greater pity for the benighted 
spiritual state of the Huron Indians and to 
greater zeal for their salvation. On my 
journey through life, adversity often presses 
hard upon me; I too have often heavy crosses 
to bear. But are they as heavy as those 
borne by the Blessed Martyr, John de 
Brebeuf? Have I ever been called upon to 
shed my blood? A sharp pain, a prolonged 
illness, a physical infirmity comes to me 
and I complain bitterly, not realizing that 
God is sending me opportunities for much 
merit. How easily I become downcast, how 
quickly impatient, how rarely resigned! I 
will ask to holy martyr to obtain for me 
some of his resignation to God's will, so that 
after his example I may be able to meet 
my daily trials in a truly Christian spirit. 
Blessed John de Brebeuf, to whom God 
gave the strength to do great things for the 
glory of His name and for the salvation of 
souls, obtain for me, through your inter- 
cession, courage to overcome all human 
respect, resignation in times of trial, con- 
fidence in God's power and goodness, and 
zeal for my spiritual welfare; so that, raised 
above the things of earth, I may lead a truly 
Christian life and gain merit for eternity. 
Amen. 



b NOVENA 

PRAYER IN HONOR OF THE 
MARTYRS 

O God, Who by the preaching and the 
blood of Thy Blessed Martyrs, John and 
Isaac and their Companions, didst consecrate 
the first fruits of the faith in the vast regions 
of North America, graciously grant that by 
their intercession the flourishing harvest of 
Christians may be everywhere and always 
increased. Through our Lord Jesus Christ 
Thy Son Who liveth and reigneth in union 
with the Holy Spirit, one God, world with- 
out end. Amen. 

PRAYER OF PETITION 

O God, Who didst inflame the hearts of 
Thy Blessed Martyrs with an admirable zeal 
for the salvation of souls, grant me, I beseech 
Thee {here make your request), so that the 
favors obtained through their intercession 
may make manifest before men the power 
and the glory of Thy Name. Amen. 

Our Father, Hail Mary. Glory be to the 
Father. 

Blessed John de Brebeuf, intercede for me! 



SECOND DAY 

Dedicated to 

Blessed Isaac Jogues, S.J. 

Martyred Oct. 18, 1646 



A DESIRE to labor in the foreign missions 
revealed itself early in the life of Blessed 
Isaac Jogues. He reached Canada in 1636 
and set out at once for Georgian Bay. The 
crushing poverty of his surroundings and his 
own ill-health did not prevent him from 
exercising his ministry, going from village to 
village instructing and baptizing converts. 
It was this holy man who, in 1639, built 
Fort Ste. Marie, the fortified residence of 
the Jesuits in the Huron country. 

In those years the Iroquois were growing 
troublesome; the Ottawa route was block- 
aded and starvation was facing the mission- 
aries. In 1642 Blessed Isaac Jogues generously 
volunteered to carry the news to Quebec and 
bring back supplies. On the return journey, 
he was seized by a skulking band of Iroquois, 
beaten with clubs, tied with thongs, flung 
into a canoe and carried to the Mohawk 
country. There he suffered still greater 
torments. His nails were torn away, his 
fingers were cut off, a squaw chewed off 
his thumb, he was suspended by the wrists 
and tortured, little children enjoyed them- 
selves by heaping coals of fire on his naked 
breast. He was then given to a Mohawk 

2 



8 NO VENA 

family as a slave. For thirteen months he 
endured a captivity worse than death, yet 
refused to escape lest some of his fellow 
prisoners who were Christians should need 
his services. When at last he freed himself, 
in 1643, his pitiable condition aroused the 
sympathies of the Calvinists of New Ams- 
terdam who received him as a martyr of 
Jesus Christ and sent him back to France. 
Pope Urban VIII. granted him permission 
to celebrate Mass notwithstanding his mutil- 
ated hands, and remarked at the same time 
that "a martyr of Christ should be allowed 
to drink the Blood of Christ." 

In less than a year he was back in Montreal, 
laboring as zealously as ever. In 1646, be- 
cause of his knowledge of the language, his 
superiors sent him to the Mohawk Valley 
in the interests of a treaty with the Iroquois. 
"His heart was seized with dread," he him- 
self informs us, at the prospect of again 
falling into the hands of the enemy. How- 
ever, he arranged for the founding of a 
mission in that "land of his crosses," and 
promised to return a few months later. 
Meanwhile the harvest of the Iroquois had 
become a failure. Those infuriated pagans, 
victims of their superstition, blamed the 
holy apostle' for this disaster, and awaited 
his return with impatience. When he ap- 
peared at Ossernenon, (now Auriesville, N.Y.) 
on October 17, 1646, he was seized and 



SECOND DAY 9 

cruelly beaten. The following day a blow 
from a tomahawk gave Blessed Isaac Jogues 
the crown of martyrdom. 

REFLECTION 

How seldom do we pause to reflect on 
the labors and the sufferings of our early 
missionaries! In this age, replete with ease 
and the comforts of life, we rarely take the 
time to recall the careers of the heroic men 
who sowed the seed of Christianity in this 
fair land of ours. And yet their heroic 
daring thrills us. Tortures had no terrors 
for them. The prospects of a cruel death 
at the hands of the savages did not prevent 
them from preaching Christ crucified. Blessed 
Isaac Jogues himself had premonitions of the 
fate that awaited him in the Mohawk Valley. 
Shortly before he set out on his final journey, 
he wrote to a friend, "I hope you will obtain 
for me this favor from Our Lord that after 
having led such a slothful life I may begin 
to serve Him better. My heart tells me that 
if I have the blessing of being sent on this 
mission, I will go but I shall not come back." 

These were the words of a holy apostle 
who endeavored to carry out the plans of 
God and whose zeal drew him to dangerous 
posts of duty. His humility made him think 
little of himself, but his confidence in God 
made him fearless, and enabled him to face 
the ferocious Iroquois, even though he realized 



10 NOVENA 

that in doing so he would have to shed his 
blood. 

Blessed Isaac Jogues, glorious martyr of 
Jesus Christ, how far does my pride and my 
weakness remove me from your brilliant 
example; how few are the sacrifices I have 
made in my life; how frail I am when called 
upon to shoulder a cross! You, who suffered 
imprisonment and torture and finally death, 
strengthen me in my resolutions; help me 
at least by your intercession to be patient 
in the trials that God may send me. Amen. 

PRAYER IN HONOR OF THE 
MARTYRS 

O God, Who by the preaching and the 
blood of Thy Blessed Martyrs, John and 
Isaac and their Companions, didst con- 
secrate the first fruits of the faith in the vast 
regions of North America, graciously grant 
that by their intercession the flourishing 
harvest of Christians may be everywhere 
and always increased. Through Our Lord 
Jesus Christ Thy Son Who liveth and reigneth 
in union with the Holy Spirit, one God, 
world without end. Amen. 

PRAYER OF PETITION 

O God, Who didst inflame the hearts of 
Thy Blessed Martyrs with an admirable zeal 
for the salvation of souls, grant me, I beseech 



SECOND DAY 11 

Thee (here make your request), so that the 
favors obtained through their intercession 
may make manifest before men the power 
and the glory of Thy Name. Amen. 

Our Father. Hail Mary. Glory be to the 
Father. 

Blessed Isaac Jogues, intercede for me! 



THIRD DAY 

Dedicated to 

Blessed Gabriel Lalemant, S.J. 

Martyred Mar. 17, 1649 



ON account of frail health, Blessed Gabriel 
Lalemant's ambition to go and labor 
for the conversion of pagan tribes was long 
delayed. And yet from his earliest years 
he had been ' 'asking God with tears and 
sighs to be sent to the Canadian missions." 
Meanwhile, we are told, he had consecrated 
himself to Our Lord for the purpose of re- 
ceiving from His hand a violent death, either 
by exposing himself among the plague-stricken 
in Old France or in seeking to save souls in 
the New. He would have esteened it a 
favor had he been allowed to die for God's 
glory in the flower of his age. 

"He was one of the most feeble and most 
delicate men one could see," wrote one of 
his contemporaries. Yet we know what 
God's grace can do, no matter how frail an 
instrument may be, when He chooses it for 
His honor and glory. 

When at last permission to cross the 
Atlantic was granted to Blessed Gabriel, he 
started off bravely, putting aside all con- 
sideration of family and friends. Not that 
he was insensible to the ties of flesh and 
blood, as is evident from his letters, but he 



THIRD DAY 13 

did not allow kinship to stand between 
himself and duty. 

His first impulse on landing at Quebec 
in 1646 was to begin at once to convert 
some pagan tribe or other, but his enthusiasm 
was curbed by his superiors, and he had to 
spend two years in the French colony before 
he set out for Georgian Bay. He arrived 
there in September, 1648, where in the words 
of Scripture this holy man was destined to 
complete a long time in a short space. He 
had been in the Huron country only seven 
months, and was just beginning to speak 
the native tongue, when he was seized with 
Blessed John de Brebeuf and forced to 
submit to torture, the recital of which makes 
one shudder. Like his fellow-martyr, he 
suffered the ordeal of boiling water poured 
over his head and of flaming torches applied 
to his naked body; he felt red-hot hatchets 
encircling his bare shoulders; his eyes were 
plucked out; his lips cut off; and after sixteen 
hours of this barbarous treatment, his soul 
took its flight to God. Blessed Gabriel 
Lalemant was martyred at Fort St. Ignace, 
near Waubaushene, Ont., on March 17, 1649. 

REFLECTION 

I will picture to myself the fearful agony 
of those sixteen hours. I will count the 
sighs sent to heaven from the lips of the 
Blessed Martyr for strength and courage to 



14 NOVENA 

bear up under the dreadful torture. Stripped 
naked like his Divine Master, he had to 
listen to the scoffs and jibes of his cruel 
persecutors; like Him he saw his flesh torn 
and bruised, and like Him he asked pardon 
for his tormentors who knew not what a 
fearful crime they were perpetrating. 

Generosity was the outstanding trait of 
this servant of God. "If it is reasonable," 
he wrote, "that one should, even at the cost 
of a thousand lives, try to bring souls to 
God, you will find no one more prompt than 
I am. Silence, then, my soul! Lose thyself 
in this holy work and give pleasure to the 
Sacred Heart of Jesus. This is His due, 
and thou canst not dispense thyself unless 
thou wilt live and die an ingrate to His 
love...." "Yes, my Jesus and my love," 
he wrote elsewhere, "Thy blood shed for 
these poor barbarians must be applied for 
their salvation. Thy name must be adored 
and Thy kingdom spread over all the nations 
of the world. I must spend my life for the 
souls of the poor savages of New France." 

Brave words, these, that reveal the in- 
nermost sentiments of the martyr. I shall 
not be called upon to suffer as did Blessed 
Gabriel Lalemant, but if I only knew how 
to profit by the pains and sufferings of this 
life, how much I could do to atone for my 
sins! I am weak and fear pain, but I should 



THIRD DAY Id 

know that God is ever watching over me, 
that His angels are counting my steps and 
weighing the value of my daily actions, and 
that if I bear my trials with resignation He 
will be my exceeding great reward. 

Blessed Gabriel Lalemant who, notwith- 
stading weakness and ill-health and the 
appeals of family and friends, generously 
gave yourself to the work of saving souls, 
and in so doing sacrificed your life by a cruel 
death, intercede for me and obtain for me 
detachment from the things of this world, 
so that, strong in the freedom of the children 
of God and following your example, I may 
share your reward in heaven. Amen. 

PRAYER IN HONOR OF THE 
MARTYRS 

O God, Who by the preaching and the 
blood of Thy Blessed Martyrs, John and 
Isaac and their Companions, didst con- 
secrate the first fruits of the faith in the vast 
regions of North America, graciously grant 
that by their intercession the flourishing 
harvest of Christians may be everywhere 
and always increased. Through our Lord 
Jesus Christ Thy Son Who liveth and reigneth 
in union with the Holy Spirit, one God, 
world without end. Amen. 



16 NOVENA 

PRAYER OF PETITION 

O God, Who didst inflame the hearts of 
Thy Blessed Martyrs with an admirable zeal 
for the salvation of souls, grant me, I beseech 
Thee {here mafe your request), so that the 
favors obtained through their intercession 
may make manifest before men the power 
and the glory of Thy Name. Amen. 

Our Father. Hail Mary. Glory be to the 
Father. 

Blessed Gabriel Lalemant, intercede for 
me! 



FOURTH DAY 

Dedicated to 

Blessed Anthony Daniel, S.J. 

Martyred July 4, 1648 



EARLY in life the lure of worldly honors 
and riches had enticed Blessed Anthony 
Daniel, but yielding to a spiritual impulse, 
he gave himself entirely to the service of God 
in the Society of Jesus. After his ordination 
to the priesthood, the call to the laborious 
missions of Canada grew louder and more 
imperious, and thither he sailed in the year 
1632. He was one of the first Jesuit mission- 
aries to reach Georgian Bay. "I never saw 
one more resolute to start out than he," 
wrote Blessed John de Brebeuf, "even when 
he was told that he might lose his life on 
the way." Yet no one suffered more than 
he did in that long canoe journey of over 
seven hundred miles. Hunger, thirst, aban- 
donment, Indian treachery, perils from the 
waters, were his portion while on the Ottawa 
route. 

Father Daniel's talent soon gave him a 
mastery over the Huron tongue and he had 
hoped to put his knowledge to good use. 
A pioneer teacher was this holy man, and he 
dreamed of forming future catechists among 
the Hurons who would instruct the other 
members of their tribe. In 1636, he set out 
for Quebec with a few Indian boys. When 



18 NOVENA 

he reached Three Rivers, Father Lejeune 
wrote: "Our hearts melted at the sight of 
Father Daniel. His face was gay and happy, 
but greatly emaciated. He was barefooted, 
had a paddle in his hand, and was clad in 
a wretched cassock, with his breviary sus- 
pended from his neck and his shirt rotting 
on his back." 

The failure of his project, owing to the 
inconstancy of the Indian character, brought 
him back to Georgian Bay. Then, after 
having labored in various Huron missions, 
he was appointed to Teanaostaye, near Mount 
St. Louis, a village exposed to Iroquois in- 
cursions and the first to be invaded by the 
merciless foe. He had completed his annual 
retreat on July 2, 1648, at Fort Ste. Marie, 
where he prepared himself for whatever God 
had in store for him, and returned at once 
to his flock. Two days later, an army of 
Iroquois appeared before the palisades of his 
village. Realizing that the end had come, 
he encouraged his converts to meet death 
as Christians should. He hastily baptized 
his catechumens and then went out to face 
the enemy. A few moments later his body 
was riddled with bullets. The enraged 
Iroquois rushed upon the prostrate form of 
the missionary, "as if he alone were the 
object of their hatred," and "smeared their 
hands and faces with his blood," wrote 
Bressani, "which flowed through so brave 
a heart." They then set fire to his chapel 



FOURTH DAY 19 

and flung his body into the flames. Father 
Daniel was martyred near Mount St. Louis, 
on July 4, 1648. 

REFLECTION 

A new civilization has sprung up and 
new conditions have arisen in this land since 
the Blessed Martyrs trod its soil. We, who 
pamper ourselves in the ease and luxury of 
modern life and who chafe under the little 
disappointments we meet daily, would find 
it difficult to visualize the hardships those 
heroic men underwent or the sufferings they 
endured. The tiresome journey over the 
Ottawa route, now travelled in a few hours, 
took weeks in the seventeenth century — and 
no one suffered more than Blessed Anthony 
Daniel. Crouched barefooted in a bark 
canoe, paddle in hand for many hours each 
day, bending under his pack in the long 
portaging over rocky trails, and sleeping 
under the stars at night, were happenings 
common in his career. When the Huron 
mission along Georgian Bay was reached, 
discomforts of every kind, insufficient cloth- 
ing to wear, cold to endure during the long 
winters, wretched cabins to live in, filthy 
savages to live with, unhealthy food to eat, 
hatred to placate, superstitions and vices to 
combat, were the everyday experiences of 
his life. But this holy man reckoned not 
the cost in his quest for souls among the 
poor Indians whom he had come to instruct 



20 NOVENA 

and convert. The Relations tell us that 
"Father Daniel seemed to have been born 
for the salvation of his flock," and add that 
"he had no greater desire than to die foi 
them, and we hope that this country will 
find in him a powerful intercessor before 
God." 

Blessed Anthony Daniel, cold and slothful 
as I am in God's service and easily disturbed 
at the hardships I meet in life, I realize that 
I do little for my own soul and less for the 
soul of my neighbor. Strengthen me with 
your courage; inspire in me a lively interest 
for all that makes for the glory of God and 
the welfare of His Church; impart to my 
soul some of your enthusiasm and zeal, so 
that I may also share in the happiness you 
are now enjoying in heaven. Amen. 

PRAYER IN HONOR OF THE 
MARTYRS 

O God, Who by the preaching and the 
blood of Thy Blessed Martyrs, John and 
Isaac and their Companions, didst con- 
secrate the first fruits of the faith in the 
vast regions of North America, graciously 
grant that by their intercession the flour- 
ishing harvest of Christians may be every- 
where and always increased. Through our 
Lord Jesus Christ Thy Son Who liveth and 
reigneth in union with the Holy Spirit, one 
God, world without end. Amen. 



FOURTH DAY 21 



PRAYER OF PETITION 

O God, Who didst inflame the hearts of 
Thy Blessed Martyrs with an admirable zeal 
for the conversion of souls, grant me, I 
beseech Thee, {here make your request), so that 
the favors obtained through their interces- 
sion may make manifest before men the 
power and the glory of Thy Name. Amen. 

Our Father. Hail Mary. Glory be to the 
Father. 

Blessed Anthony Daniel, intercede for 
me! 



FIFTH DAY 

Dedicated to 

Blessed Charles Gamier, S.J. 

Martyred Dec. 7, 1649 



FROM his earliest childhood, Blessed 
Charles Gamier was an angel of in- 
nocence and purity. At first, his parents 
opposed his design to enter the Society of 
Jesus, but when they realized that their 
beloved child was really in earnest, they 
made the sacrifice nobly. When the moment 
of separation came, the Superiors of the 
Order were told that they were about to 
receive one who from his birth had never 
committed the least disobedience and had 
never given his parents the least displeasure. 
The young man himself, whose devotion to 
our Lady was paramount, acknowledged in 
after life that it was she who carried him 
in her arms in his youthful years, and that 
it was to her he owed his vocation to the 
Society of her Divine Son. 

The arduous missions of Canada attracted 
the young priest and his only desire was to 
begin as soon as possible the work of con- 
version among the Indians along Goergian 
Bay. He had hardly reached his mission, 
when he was stricken down with fever and 
was soon at the point of death. But God 
was reserving him for other labors, and not- 
withstanding the accompaniments of dire 



FIFTH DAY 23 

poverty, lack of medical aid and unwhole- 
some food, he recovered slowly, acquired a 
knowledge of the Huron tongue and started 
out on an active apostolate of thirteen years, 
Driven from the Petun country as a sorcerer, 
he spent six years at Teanaostaye, where 
he succeeded in winning many souls to God. 
Replete with every gift of nature and of 
grace, he was irresistible in his appeals to 
the uncouth pagans. Converts were won to 
the faith and moved to devotion at the 
mere sight of his angelic face, and all who 
came in contact with him took away a deep 
impression of his virtue. But this interior 
perfection of soul was, as in the case of all 
holy men, sustained by a life of rigid penance. 
Every time he returned from his mission 
journeys, he sharpened the iron points of 
the belt which he wore next to his flesh. 
He mortified his tastes and inclinations in 
every way; food, lodging, surroundings, all 
gave him a foretaste of the martyrdom which 
was soon to be his reward. 

When he returned to the Petun nation, 
whence he had once been driven as a sorcerer, 
he found among those Indians a large outlet 
for his devouring zeal. The Iroquois, prowling 
around in bands, swooped down on the 
defenceless inhabitants of the village of 
Etharita on December 7, 1649, put many to 
death and made prisoners of all who could 
not escape. 



24 NOVENA 

Father Gamier was one of the victims of 
this merciless massacre. When implored to 
save himself by flight, he resolutely refused, 
exercising his charity to the end. Even 
though mortally wounded and weltering in 
his blood, he tried to assist a poor Huron 
who had also received his death wound. A 
few moments later, the blow of an Iroquois 
tomahawk penetrated his brain, and his pure 
soul took its flight to God. Blessed Charles 
Gamier was martyred on December 7, 1649. 

REFLECTION 

The memory of this holy martyr is one 
of the most highly cherished in our mis- 
sionary annals, and many practical lessons 
may be gleaned from the study of his life. 
His innocence and purity of soul, the suffer- 
ings he endured, coupled with the penances 
he inflicted on his virginal body, have cast 
a halo over his career. One of his com- 
panions in the mission field wrote of this 
lovable man, " During the four years that 
I lived with him I never saw in him a single 
fault that was directly against any virtue/' 
Father Ragueneau, his spiritual adviser for 
twelve years, could write immediately after 
his glorious death, "His great desire for 
holiness had grown with him from child- 
hood. I can truly say that in those twelve 
years I do not think that, save in sleep, he 
spent a single hour without a vehement 



FIFTH DAY 25 

desire of advancing more and more in the 
ways of God, and of urging on his fellow- 
men in the same direction. Nothing in the 
world turned him from these considerations, 
neither relatives nor friends, neither rest nor 
fatigue. God was his all. All else meant 
nothing for him." 

Blessed Charles Gamier, whose innocence 
of life and burning zeal for souls have, during 
three hundred years, given you a hallowed 
place in our annals, help me to be generous 
in the service of God. I fear pain, I shun 
mortification, I lack generosity. Your ex- 
ample is before me; your spotless purity, 
your rigorous penances, your devotion to 
Our Lady, all impress me. I now ask your 
intercession whereby my resolutions may be 
strengthened. Inspire in me a love of purity 
and zeal. Give me courage to do something 
for my soul, so that in the end I may share 
your bliss in Paradise. Amen. 

PRAYER IN HONOR OF THE 
MARTYRS 

O God, Who by the preaching and the 
blood of Thy Blessed Martyrs, John and 
Isaac and their Companions, didst con- 
secrate the first fruits of the faith in the 
vast regions of North America, graciously 
grant that by their intercession the flourish- 
ing harvest of Christians may be every- 
where and always be increased. Through Our 



26 NOVENA 

Lord Jesus Christ Thy Son Who liveth and 
reigneth in union with the Holy Spirit, one 
God, world without end. Amen. 

PRAYER OF PETITION 

O God, Who didst inflame the hearts of 
Thy Blessed Martyrs with an admirable zeal 
for the salvation of souls, grant me, I be- 
seech Thee {here make your request), so that 
the favors obtained through their interces- 
sion may make manifest before men the 
power and the glory of Thy Name. Amen. 

Our Father. Hail Mary. ' Glory to be the 
Father. 

Blessed Charles Gamier, intercede for 
me! 



m<® <§>ia 



SIXTH DAY 

Dedicated to 

Blessed Noel Chabanel, SJ. 

Martyred Dec. 8, 1649 



THE Spirit of God had spoken early to 
the soul of Blessed Noel Chabanel, for 
he was only seventeen when he took up the 
obligations of the religious life. Meanwhile 
the desire to consecrate himself to the arduous 
Canadian missions was asserting itself. "God 
gave him a strong vocation for those coun- 
tries," wrote one of his contemporaries, and 
he seized the earliest opportunity to cross 
the Atlantic. Patiently bearing the hard- 
ships of a three months' voyage, he reached 
Quebec in August, 1643, and, full of zeal 
and enthusiasm, lost no time in 'starting for 
the Huron country. But the young mis- 
sionary was quickly undeceived. The wild 
aspect of Georgian Bay, with its half-naked 
Indian population, their miserable cabins, 
their poverty and squalor, their gross ways 
and manners, all made a profound impression 
on his sensitive soul. And, to add to his 
sorrow, after months of serious study, he 
made little or no progress in the barbarous 
Huron tongue. Only then it dawned upon 
him that his life was to be one unbroken 
chain of disappointments, an ordeal that he 
himself called a "bloodless martyrdom." 



28 NOVENA 

The deep sense of his own uselessness 
was so completely overpowering that the 
temptation came to him to abandon the 
Huron field and return to France where he 
could find employment better suited to his 
talents and his character. Why fritter away 
his life fruitlessly among barbarians? But 
Chabanel had put his hand to the plough 
and he was resolved not to turn back till 
he had reached the end of the furrow. In 
order to bind himself irrevocably to the 
Huron mission, he made a vow in 1647 to 
remain there till death. For two years he 
stood in the shadow of martyrdom and was 
then slain secretly by an apostate Huron. 
The assassin confessed his crime, and added 
that he did it out of hatred of the Christian 
faith. "Chabanel's death," wrote Char- 
levoix, "while it was less striking in the eyes 
ol men, was not less striking in the eyes of 
God, Who judges according to the disposition 
of our hearts and Who keeps as strict account 
of what we would like to have done as of 
what we have done." Blessed Noel Chabanel 
was martyred on the banks of the Notta- 
wasaga, on December 8, 1649. 

REFLECTION 

What an illustrious example of persever- 
ance in the midst of difficulties and of heroic 
resignation to God's will Blessed Noel 
Chabanel gives us! This holy Martyr had 



SIXTH DAY 29 

hoped to be a useful worker in the vineyard, 
yet disappointment and ill-success met him 
at every turn. Persuaded that his was an 
unprofitable life, he lived for five years in 
perpetual desolation, a species of torture 
which for holy and sensitive souls like his 
closely resembles its counterpart in blood. 
In this extremity who would blame Noel 
Chabanel if he sought somewhere a ray of 
courage and consolation ? But the Relations 
inform us that this saintly man carried his 
cross bravely, and rather than consent to 
be released from his burden, obliged him- 
self by vow to carry it even unto death. 

I often complain of the trials I have to 
put up with, but how insignificant are mine 
when compared with those of Blessed Noel! 
I have never had to live in the shadow of 
martyrdom, nor have I had occasion to 
complain, as he did once, that the crown 
had been snatched from him, a circumstance 
he attributed to his own unworthiness. 
Encouraged by his example, I will accept 
the trials that God sends me. I will bear 
the cross as long as He wills it. I will implore 
this great servant of God to intercede for 
me and obtain for me the grace to enable 
me to do so. 

Blessed Noel Chabanel, whose heart 
burned with the desire to sacrifice all for 
the glory and honor of God, obtain for me 
a right appreciation of the trials and suffer- 
ings of this life. Let not disappointments 



30 NO VENA 

discourage me nor crosses weigh me down, 
so that strengthened by the example of your 
heroic constancy and perseverance in the 
service of God on earth, I may some day 
share your reward in heaven. Amen. 

PRAYER IN HONOR OF THE 
MARTYRS 

O God, Who by the preaching and the 
blood of Thy Blessed Martyrs, John and 
Isaac and their Companions, didst consecrate 
the first fruits of the faith in the vast regions 
of North America, graciously grant that by 
their intercession the flourishing harvest ot 
Christians may be everywhere and always 
increased. Through Our Lord Jesus Christ 
Thy Son Who liveth and reigneth in union 
with the Holy Spirit, one God, world with- 
out end. Amen. 

PRAYER OF PETITION 

O God, Who didst inflame the hearts of 
Thy Blessed Martyrs with an admirable zeal 
for the salvation of souls, grant me, I beseech 
Thee {here make your request), so that the 
favors obtained through their intercession 
may make manifest before men the power 
and the glory of Thy Name. Amen. 

Our Father. Hail Mary. Glory be to the 
Father. 

Blessed Noel Chabanel, intercede for me! 






SEVENTH DAY 

Dedicated to 

Blessed Rene Goupil, S.J. 

Martyred Sept. 29, 1642 



BLESSED Rene Goupil was one of those 
earnest men who wished to gain their 
eternal crown by serving God in humble 
employments. For this purpose he entered 
the Jesuit Order in early life and gave edi- 
fication by his strict observance of the rules. 
His health failed him, however, and he had 
to return to secular life, determined, not- 
withstanding, to do something for God. The 
perusal of the Relations had shown him that 
if he could not work directly in the apostolate 
of souls, he could at least help those who 
were thus employed, and he sailed for Canada 
about the year 1640 to serve the mission- 
aries who labored there. During the follow- 
ing two years his skill as a surgeon gave 
him ample scope for activity among both 
the French colonists and the native con- 
verts, in whom he saw our Lord in His 
suffering members and whom he treated with 
sweet patience and charity. 

While on his way to the Huron country 
with Blessed Isaac Jogues, in 1642, he was 
seized by the Iroquois and obliged to undergo 
fearful tortures. His virtue revealed itself in 
those crucial moments of his life. In an 
act of sublime resignation, he turned to his 



32 NOVENA 

priestly companion and exclaimed, "May God 
be blessed! He has permitted this. May 
His will be done! I accept this cross, I desire 
it, I embrace it with all my heart." His 
captors tore of his finger nails, crushed his 
bleeding fingers between their teeth, and 
showered blows upon him. Notwithstanding 
the excruciating pains he was enduring, the 
holy young man showed great fortitude and 
presence of mind, and although suffering 
himself, he succeeded in helping Father 
Jogues to instruct a Huron who had not yet 
been baptized and who was begging to 
receive the sacrament. 

Rene Goupil was taken prisoner to the 
Mohawk country, where further tortures were 
inflicted upon him. It was while on this 
bitter journey that he begged Father Jogues 
to receive his vows, asserting that God had 
always given him a great desire to con- 
secrate himself to His service in the Society 
of Jesus. The Indians of Ossernenon, the 
first Mohawk village, received him with a 
shower of blows, so that when he entered 
the gates of the palisade he sank to the 
ground, bruised and disfigured and weltering 
in his blood. He was not slain immediately, 
as he expected, but a few weeks later he was 
seen making the Sign of the Cross on the 
forehead of a little Indian child. A super- 
stitious pagan, becoming enraged at this act, 
ordered one of the young warriors to kill 
him. The wretch raised his tomahawk and 



SEVENTH DAY 33 

split the martyr's skull open. Blessed Rene 
Goupil was slain at Auriesville, in the Mohawk 
Valley, on September 29, 1642. 

REFLECTION 

Holiness, coupled with a spirit of self- 
sacrifice, is the picture presented to us in 
the admirable life of this young martyr. 
His virtue was vouched for by his companion 
in captivity. "It was on the feast of St. 
Michael," wrote Blessed Isaac Jogues, "that 
this angel of innocence and martyr of Jesus 
Christ gave His life for Him who had offered 
up His for him. I kissed his relics very de- 
voutly several times as those of a martyr. 
I give him this title," added Father Jogues, 
"not merely because he was slain by the ene- 
mies of God and His Church, and in the 
exercise of an ardent charity towards his 
neighbor, by putting himself in evident peril 
for the love of God, but especially because 
he was slain on account of prayer and nota- 
bly for the Sign of the Cross." 

Hatred of the Cross of Christ was the 
motive that inspired the savage Iroquois to 
murder Rene Goupil. Father Bressani, him- 
self a victim of their cruelty, wrote two 
years later: "They particularly hate the Sign 
of the Cross, which they have learned from 
the Dutch to be a veritable superstition, and 
on this account they killed the good Rene 
Goupil, the companion of Father Jogues." 



34 NOVENA 

Blessed Rene Goupil, whose zeal for the 
Cross of Christ merited the crown of martyr- 
dom, give me the courage always to glory 
in the Cross and never to be ashamed of it. 
Help me to understand, what seems so hard 
to my ungenerous soul, that the more wil- 
lingly I carry my cross the lighter it becomes; 
so that, following your example and that of 
the saints, I may in patience and long-suffer- 
ing carry my burdens bravely to the end. 
Amen. 

PRAYER IN HONOR OF THE 
MARTYRS 

O God, Who by the preaching and the 
blood of Thy Blessed Martyrs, John and 
Isaac and their Companions, didst con- 
secrate the first fruits of the faith in the 
vast regions of North America, graciously 
grant that by their intercession the flourish- 
ing harvest of Christians may be everywhere 
and always increased. Through our Lord 
Jesus Christ Thy Son Who liveth and reigneth 
in union with the Holy Spirit, one God, world 
without end. Amen. 

PRAYER OF PETITION 

O God, Who didst inflame the hearts of 
Thy Blessed Martyrs with an admirable zeal 
for the salvation of souls, grant me, I be- 



SEVENTH DAY 6b 

seech Thee (here make your request), so that 
the favors obtained through their interces- 
sion may make manifest before men the 
power and the glory of Thy Name. Amen. 

Our Father. Hail Mary. Glory be to the 
Father. 

Blessed Rene Goupil, intercede for me! 



H#- 



EIGHT DAY 

Dedicated to 

Blessed John de la Lande 

Martyred Oct. 19, 1646 



THIS young layman and saintly com- 
panion of Blessed Isaac Jogues was a 
victim of the Iroquois who had learned to 
hate the doctrines of Christ and to fear those 
who taught them. He was chosen to ac- 
company Father Jogues when the latter set 
out in 1646 to found a mission among the 
Iroquois in the Mohawk Valley. The dangers 
of the journey were not hidden from him. 
When told that he might have to suffer, he 
gladly offered himself for the enterprise, 
looking only to God to protect him and to 
be his reward if the sacrifice of his life were 
demanded. Or, as Father Ragueneau puts 
it, "He belonged to a chosen few who were 
only too happy to pour out their sweat and, 
if need be, their blood, in order to contribute 
as much as they could towards the con- 
version of the barbarians." The brave youth 
did not count the cost of the sacrifice he was 
about to make. "Although he was aware 
of the danger," wrote Father Bressani, "he 
faced it courageously, without hope of any 
reward but Paradise." 

The hour had come at last when his 
virtue was to be put to its first heroic test, 
and when he was to taste the bitter cup 



EIGHTH DAY 37 

which God presents to the lips of those for 
whom He has reserved the princely crown 
of martyrdom. With fiendish delight the 
Iroquois threw themselves on John de la 
Lande, stripped him naked and belabored 
him with blows. Father Jogues had already 
tasted the agony of Iroquois cruelty, but it 
was a new and thrilling experience for the 
young man, who notwithstanding his dreadful 
sufferings possessed his soul in peace. "You 
shall die tomorrow!" the chiefs exclaimed. 
"Your head will fall under our tomahawks 
and will be placed on our palisades to show 
your brethren what fate awaits them." 
Meanwhile pieces of his flesh were cut from 
his arms and devoured before his eyes. Wild 
threats of assassination were being echoed 
in the village of Ossernenon. A few hours 
later, the threat was executed upon Isaac 
Jogues. On the following day it was the 
turn of John de la Lande, at Auriesville, in 
the Mohawk Valley, October 19, 1646. 

REFLECTION 

Here I pause to admire the hidden ways 
of God. In after years the ferocious Iroquois 
who had slain our martyrs, and who for 
nearly half a century were the mortal enemies 
of the Christian faith, had the Gospel preached 
to them and became humble followers of 
Christ. In the very land where Blessed 
John de la Lande, Isaac Jogues and Rene 



38 NOVENA 

Goupil had been slain for the faith, flourish- 
ing missions were founded and flowers of 
holiness blossomed forth. Under the divine 
influence of the doctrines of Christ, preached 
by the successors of those martyrs, wolves 
became lambs, and glory was given to God 
in a land where the enemy of men's souls 
had so long held sway. The blood of martyrs 
had become the seed of Christians in the 
New World as in the Old; but in order to 
bring this about, holy missionaries in their 
sweat and blood blazed their way through 
the dense growth of superstition which had 
lor centuries gathered around the unhappy 
Indian tribes. In the designs of God, ap- 
parently, our heroic missionary age — the 
second quarter of the seventeenth century 
— had to be lived through and endured. 
Surely the eight victims of that tragic era 
who gave their blood so freely, and who 
have been raised to the honors of the altar 
by the Infallible Church, have still some 
interest in the land where they won their 
crowns of martyrdom and will listen to the 
humble petitions of those who ask their 
intercession. They were the friends of God 
in those years; they are not less His friends 
in the age in which we live. 

Blessed John de la Lande, who conse- 
crated your life to God in the service of His 
missionaries, who served those holy men in 
lowly employments, and who in the end 
received the crown which is the reward of 



EIGHTH DAY 39 

humble and devoted service, intercede for 
me with the Divine Master, so that if my 
petition be agreeable to His holy will I may 
obtain what I ask. Amen. 

PRAYER IN HONOR OF THE 
MARTYRS 

O God, Who by the preaching and the 
blood of Thy Blessed Martyrs, John and Isaac 
and their Companions, didst consecrate the 
first fruits of the faith in the vast regions 
of North America, graciously grant that by 
their intercession the flourishing harvest of 
Christians may be everywhere and always 
increased. Through our Lord Jesus Christ 
Thy Son Who liveth and reigneth in union 
with the Holy Spirit, one God, world with- 
out end. Amen. 

PRAYER OF PETITION 

O God Who didst inflame the hearts of 
Thy Blessed Martyrs with an admirable zeal 
for the salvation of souls, grant me, I be- 
seech Thee {here make your request), so that 
the favors obtained through their inter- 
cession may make manifest before men the 
power and the glory of Thy name. Amen. 

Our Father. Hail Mary. Glory be to the 
Father. 

Blessed John de la Lande, intercede for 
me! 



NINTH DAY 

Dedicated to 
The Queen of Martyrs 



-♦K 



4 



MARY lovingly watched over our 
Martyrs during the years of their 
labors and sufferings along Georgian Bay, 
and those heroic men endeavored to repay 
her for her motherly love and tenderness. 
"The general and special obligations that we 
are under to this great Princess of heaven 
and earth," wrote a Huron missionary in 
1638, "makes it one of our keenest disap- 
pointments that we are not able to show 
her sufficient gratitude. At least we can 
claim the consolation that henceforth as 
often as people shall speak of the chief 
residence of the mission of the Hurons, 
calling it by the name of Ste. Marie, it will 
be so much homage rendered to her for 
what we owe to her and hold from her, and 
a pledge of what we wish to be to her forever." 
Fort Ste. Marie will remain forever an 
historic monument of the devotion of Blessed 
John de Brebeuf and his Companions to 
their incomparable Queen. It was built in 
her honor and given her name. Thither 
they went after their wanderings and fatigues 
to rest and recuperate their strength for 
other labors. Under Mary's roof, hidden 
away in a forest near Georgian Bay, they 



NINTH DAY 41 

gathered together at stated times to confer 
on the interests of their missions. In that 
home of peace, and under her protecting 
mantle, they withdrew to commune with 
God in their annual retreats. At Fort 
Ste. Marie they assembled their Huron 
neophytes for instruction and baptism. There 
thousands of Indian pilgrims gathered yearly 
to renew their pledge of perseverance in the 
practices of the Christian faith. And when 
the moment of disaster came in 1649, it was 
there that the venerable victims of the 
Iroquois, Blessed John de Brebeuf and 
Gabriel Lalemant, were laid in their graves. 

REFLECTION 

Happily the memory of Mary and her 
Canadian Martyrs has been revived at the 
self-same spot. After three hundred years 
the Shrine of Fort Ste. Marie has risen 
from its ruins, and its two steeples, now 
silhouetted against the sky, will recall not 
merely the years when Mary reigned in the 
hearts of her humble servants laboring along 
Georgian Bay, but it will renew in our times 
scenes often witnessed in that heroic age. 
As in the seventeenth century, when thou- 
sands of Huron Christians, urged by holy 
men as yet uncrowned by martyrdom, went 
to Fort Ste. Marie to implore the aid of Mary 
in their trials and sorrows, so also in the 
twentieth other thousands, attracted by the 



42 NOVENA 

glory of Ste. Marie's beatified apostles, will 
frequent the same venerable spot, there to 
pour out their prayers and supplications. 
And as they kneel and pray at a Shrine 
teeming with so many historic and holy 
souvenirs, they may confidently hope that 
the Queen of Heaven and her heroic sons, 
now ennobled by the Church, will listen to 
their petitions and will generously grant 
them what they ask for. 

Glorious Queen of Martyrs, to whom the 
early missionaries of this country were so 
devoted and from whom they received so 
many favors, graciously listen to my petition. 
Ask Thy Divine Son to remember all they 
did for His glory; remind Him that they 
preached the Gospel and made His holy 
Name known to thousands who had never 
heard of Him, and then had their apostolic 
labors crowned by shedding their blood for 
Him. Exercise thy motherly influence as 
thou didst at Cana, and implore Him to 
grant me what I ask in this Novena if it 
be conformable to His holy will. 

PRAYER IN HONOR OF THE 
MARTYRS 

O God, Who by the preaching and the 
blood of Thy Martyrs, Blessed John and 
Isaac and their Companions, didst conse- 
crate the first fruits of the faith in the vast 
regions of North America, graciously grant 



NINTH DAY 43 

that by their intercession the flourishing 
harvest of Christians may be everywhere 
and always increased. Through Our Lord 
Jesus Christ Thy Son who liveth and reigneth 
in union with the Holy Spirit, one God, 
world without end. Amen. 

PRAYER OF PETITION 

O God Who didst inflame the hearts of 
Thy Blessed Martyrs with an admirable zeal 
for the salvation of souls, grant me, I be- 
seech Thee (here make your request), so that 
the favors obtained through their inter- 
cession may make manifest before men the 
power and the glory of Thy name. Amen. 

Our Father. Hail Mary. Glory be to the 
Father. 

Mary Queen of Martyrs, intercede for me! 



-•§>B 



LITANY 

In Honor of the Blessed Martyrs 
(For private use) 



LORD, have mercy on us. 
Christ, have mercy on us. 

Lord, have mercy on us. 

Christ, hear us. 

Christ, graciously hear us. 

God the Father of Heaven, have mercy on us. 

God the Son, Redeemer of the world, have mercy on us 

God the Holy Ghost, have mercy on us. 

Holy Trinity, one God, have mercy on us 

Holy Mary, Mother of God, 

♦Blessed John de Brebeuf , noble apostle and martyr, 

*Blessed Isaac Jogues, doubly a martyr for Christ, 

*Blessed Gabriel Lalemant, hero of constancy in 
martyrdom, 

♦Blessed Anthony Daniel, martyr of zeal and self- 
sacrifice, 

♦Blessed Charles Gamier, angel of penance and 
martyr, 

•Blessed Noel Chabanel, martyred in desolation and 
abandonment, 

Blessed Rene Goupil, martyred for the sign of the 
Cross, 

Blessed John de la Lande, martyred in the service 
of martyrs, 

All ye Holy Martyrs of Christ, 

Pioneers of the Cross in a new world, 

Heroic apostles of the faith, 

Zealous promoters of God's glory, 

Men consumed with love for souls, 

Fruitful leaders of souls to God, 

Men of prayer and action, 



* Asterisks indicate the six martyrs who lived at Fort Ste. 
Marie (1639-1649). The ashes of Blessed John de Brebeuf 
andGahrul Lahmant still lie buried there. 



LITANY 45 

Lovers of poverty, 

Models of purity, 

Faithful in obedience, 

Intrepid in dangers, 

Undaunted in hardships, 

Followers of Christ Crucified, 

Fearless in suffering for Christ, 

Enduring hunger and thirst for Christ, 

Stripped and scourged for Christ, 

Tortured by fire for Christ, 

Cruelly slain for Christ, 

Peerless athletes of God, 

Loving children of the Queen of Martyrs, 

Filial clients of St. Joseph, 

Worthy sons of St. Ignatius, 

Our intercessors in Heaven, 

Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the world, 

spare us, Lord. 
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the world, 

graciously hear us, Lord. 
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the world, 

have mercy on us. 

V. Pray for us, O Blessed Martyrs, 

R. That we may be made worthy of the promises of 
Christ. 

LET US PRAY 

O God, Who by the preaching and the blood of Thy 
Blessed Martyrs, John and Isaac and their Companions, 
didst consecrate the first fruits of the faith in the vast 
regions of North America, graciously grant that by their 
intercession the flourishing harvest of Christians may 
be everywhere and always increased. Through Our Lord 
Jesus Christ Thy Son Who liveth and reigneth in union 
with the Holy Spirit, one God, world without end. 

Amen. 



The Martyrs' Shrine 

NEAR MIDLAND, ONT. 

Is open for the reception of pilgrims 

during the months of July 

and August. 



HOW THE SHRINE MAY BE REACHED: 

I. — By automobile direct over all highways 
leading to Midland. 

II. — By rail direct to ' 'Martyrs' Shrine" 
Station on the C. N. R., Toronto-Midland 
branch. 

III. — By Canadian Pacific Lake Service to 
Port McNicoll, two miles away. 'Bus 
service. 

IV. — By all lake steamships docking at Mid- 
land, two miles away. 'Bus service. 

V. — By motor-boats up the Wye River direct 
to the Shrine. 



Correspondence should be addressed, dur- 
ing July and August, to The Rev. Director, 
Martyrs ' Shrine, Midland, Ont. 

During the rest of the year, to 160 Welles- 
ley Crescent, Toronto, Ont. 



MESSENQCR PRESS, MONTREAL